Word a Day Writing

Last year I bought a “Word A Day” desk calendar in a charity shop, and although I’m not doing them daily, I’m using them as prompts to freewrite a short passage.  These are the ones I’ve done this month.

Day 41: Baksheesh (or bakshish) (noun).  Tip, fringe benefit.

I knew that eventually she would recognise me.  This was my third full-fat cappuccino in 3 hrs.  If only she would look up at me as I handed over my change.  I decided to give it 3 more drinks before I left a note with my tip.

Day 42: Eupeptic (adj).  Cheerful.

The colours shone from the page, and gleamed in her eyes.  She felt calm and peaceful.  Art was healing her wounds and with luck, sometimes soon she might even feel cheerful.

Day 43: Lucubration (noun).  Late night study by lamplight.

She sat curled up in the large comfy chair – clad in blue flannel pajamas and wrapped in a fluffy blanket.  In one hand she held a cup of steaming hot cocoa with marshmallows and in the other she held her textbook.

Day 44: Idoneous (adj).  Suitable, appropriate or proper.

I’d never been in a situation that left me unsure.  I always, ALWAYS knew what to do.  I’d read every book of etiquette written, and attended six classes a year.  I knew the proper response to everything.  Until now.

Day 45: Scend (noun).  Upward surge of vessel; lifting force of wave.

This was not exactly how I’d always dreamed my honeymoon would be.  There were no sunset walks on the promenade arm in arm.  There were no dinners with the captain.  I sat on the deck staring at the stars while my husband vomited with every scend.

Day 46: Hagiology (noun).  Literature about the lives and legends of the saints.

Historians would remember her as a saint.  Generations in the future would read about her deeds and she would be lauded for her courage and selflessness.  The name Aislynn would be immortalised.

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About Colette Horsburgh

A 30-something creator/baker/writer/doodler/crafter living with several (but not enough) scatty animals.
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